Well Sealing

Well Sealing and Abandonment

Wells that are not being used should be sealed or abandoned (decommissioned) to avoid potential safety hazards and groundwater contamination.

  • Commercial and Residential properties
  • Hand dug wells
  • Drilled wells

Achieving Water Well Abandonment

Most states and local counties require any old and/or unused well to be abandoned and/or sealed by licensed contractors, like Easterday-Wilson’s certified State Water Specialists.

Well sealing is a relatively brief, but meticulous process:

  • Our crews first remove all pumps and pipes from the well
  • If possible, we remove all casing, liners, and screens
  • Starting from the bottom and moving up, we will fill the well with gravel and bentonite, or occasionally concrete
  • When the well has been sealed, we will send certified documents to the owner, county, and state

Do You Have an Unused Well on Your Property?

Signs that an existing well may be present include:

  • Pipes protruding from ground
  • Small buildings that may have served as a well house
  • Depressions in the earth
  • Concrete vaults or pits covered by lumber or metal plates
  • Out-of-use windmills and pumps, or additions to older homes – which were typically located in close proximity to a well
  • Pipes protruding from ground
  • Small buildings that may have served as a well house
  • Depressions in the earth
  • Concrete vaults or pits covered by lumber or metal plates
  • Out-of-use windmills and pumps, or additions to older homes – which were typically located in close proximity to a well

Well sealing is a critical step in protecting one of our most precious resources from contamination.

Ensure the safety of your drinking water – and that of your neighbors. Contact Easterday-Wilson today.

Accreditations & Certifications

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